[concurrency-interest] Best CPUs for testing

Joe Bowbeer joe.bowbeer at gmail.com
Wed Dec 13 11:37:24 EST 2006


Minor correction.

I wrote:

"... and consequentially needs a lot of memory barriers"

Should be consequently.

As long as I'm correcting a nit:

"... since Alpha's Java VM implementation is so tightly fenced, perhaps the
Java apps running [within] it are ..."


On 12/13/06, Joe Bowbeer <joe.bowbeer at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> At the machine level, the DEC Alpha used to be the platform that would
> expose the most bugs because it imposed the least order -- and was even
> purported to flaunt this at every opportunity in order to shake out bugs.
> (The principle of "least astonishment" turned on its head to benefit
> testing.)
>
> You can see in the cookbook that the Alpha has little respect for data
> dependencies and consequentially needs a lot of memory barriers:
>
> http://gee.cs.oswego.edu/dl/jmm/cookbook.html
>
> On the other hand, since Alpha's Java VM implementation is so tightly
> fenced, perhaps the Java apps running on it are *less* likely to do anything
> astonishing? :-)
>
>
> On 12/13/06, Péter Kovács <peter.kovacs at chemaxon.hu> wrote:
> >
> >
> > A passage in "The Java Memory Model" section in "Concurrent Programming
> > in Java" prompted me to ask the question: can the CPUs currently
> > available on the market be ranked by their suitability for detecting
> > concurrent programming problems.  [...]
> >
> > Any comment appreciated.
> >
> >
>
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